Restorative Narrative-Clown Style

Restorative Narrative-Clown Style

I don’t know if if surviving in today’s world is more difficult than in decades and centuries past. The determination is dependent on how you define ‘survival.’ One thing is certain: Globalization has impacted the world at every level and has changed how we survive, how we interact, and how we respond. We can choose to respond with positivity and restorative narrative.   There is no shortage of dire disasters and impending gloom in the news. The news articulates important stories and crises that our global society needs to know. We need to maintain awareness of how actions cause reactions, who needs help, and who is helping.   The World may be suffering but there are enough artists in the world to help alleviate the suffering.   Clowns Without Borders chooses hope, objective reality, and shared community building. We choose Restorative Narratives. We didn’t coin the term – ivoh did, but we really like what it stands for and what it means in the global context.   Clowns Without Borders seeks restorative narrative of the world by offering Resilience Through Laughter and to advocate for those in crisis and conflict by sharing Education Through Awareness. Founder of Clowns Without Borders, Tortell Poltrona, says that we need to be doing this work until CWB no longer needs to exist. Agreed. It starts with the invitation for us to come somewhere. We research to understand the needs of the NGO’s and populations being served. We find and bring in the local artists, or theater companies, or schools, or local grassroots groups and help everyone work together, with mentorship, compassion, caring, and...
Resilience through Laughter with Refugees

Resilience through Laughter with Refugees

The global refugee crisis continues in 2016 and so does the response from Clowns Without Borders. We closely monitor the situation and hope for a peaceful resolution that addresses the problem at its core while compassionately respecting the lives of those directly involved. In February of this year, with the sponsorship of Clowns Without Borders Sweden, we sent a troupe of clown performers to the Greek island of Lesvos. Those involved witnessed daily, the heroism of refugees and asylum seekers. We also saw the profound dedication of scores of volunteer aid workers and Greek citizens.   During the second half of 2016 Clowns Without Borders troupes will return to several countries that have hosted refugee populations for a long time: Turkey, Kenya, Greece, and Lebanon. We go to share Resilience Through Laughter and offer moments of levity to children and families in crisis. Humor is medicine and psycho-social relief benefits refugees and the aid workers charged to help them.   More details will emerge in the coming months. We’ll announce the projects as soon as the dates are set. In the meantime, keep the humanity in your hearts and smiles on your faces! Your smile may change somebody’s day – maybe even yours!  To learn about Clowns Without Borders previous projects, click the link to visit the project pages for Turkey, Greece, Kenya, and Lebanon....
A Clown’s Perspective on Volunteering

A Clown’s Perspective on Volunteering

Written by Kolleen Kintz In 2012, after 8 months volunteering my time for Clowns Without Border’s social media and fundraising, I got the call I’d been hoping for and would be going into the field on my first project. I would be leaving for Indonesia in just a few short weeks. Holy cow! After I got off the phone with Tim Cunningham, executive director at this time, my excitement was skyrocketing! This was my chance: to make a difference, to be a strong contributor to my team, to be a representative of Clowns Without Borders. It was all happening!!! Shortly thereafter, the high wore off, worry set in, and my confidence began to plummet. Was I experienced enough? Would I be able to pull my weight? Would my team like me? Would my audiences like me? And, the question of all questions, would I be funny? My eyes started scanning the room, my juggling balls gathering dust in the corner, my costume pieces seeming incomplete, my 30-day handstand challenge severely lacking validation stickers. Oh no! Maybe I was going to let everyone down? My momentum came to a screeching halt and I began to panic.   I remember talking with Tim later the next week, assuring him (but more myself) that I had a comprehensive plan in action. My juggling was really coming along. I had been learning new songs on my guitar. I had been drilling acrobatics until my muscles ached. I was going to be ready for this! Tim, in the most perfectly-Tim way, said, “Cool Kolleen, that sounds great! It’s good to practice these things, but...